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Slave Songs of the United States
(eBook)

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Published
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, 2011.
Status
Available Online
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Format
eBook
Language
English
ISBN
9780807869505
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

William Francis Allen., William Francis Allen|AUTHOR., & Charles Pickard Ware|AUTHOR. (2011). Slave Songs of the United States. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

William Francis Allen, William Francis Allen|AUTHOR and Charles Pickard Ware|AUTHOR. 2011. Slave Songs of the United States. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

William Francis Allen, William Francis Allen|AUTHOR and Charles Pickard Ware|AUTHOR, Slave Songs of the United States. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, 2011.

MLA Citation (style guide)

William Francis Allen, William Francis Allen|AUTHOR, and Charles Pickard Ware|AUTHOR. Slave Songs of the United States. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, 2011. Web.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouping Information

Grouped Work IDc8d9ce4a-a166-5cba-0e8b-39ff2362ee96
Full titleslave songs of the united states
Authorallen william francis
Grouping Categorybook
Last Update2020-05-02 01:00:48AM
Last Indexed2020-07-30 04:45:11AM

Book Cover Information

Image Sourcehoopla
First LoadedFeb 19, 2020
Last UsedJul 2, 2020

Hoopla Extract Information

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    [year] => 2011
    [artist] => William Francis Allen
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    [profanity] => 
    [title] => Slave Songs of the United States
    [publisherNumber] => 0807869503
    [demo] => 
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            [0] => 19th Century
            [1] => American - African American Studies
            [2] => Ethnic Studies
            [3] => History
            [4] => Social Science
            [5] => United States
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    [price] => 1.99
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    [active] => 1
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    [synopsis] => First published in 1867, Slave Songs of the United States represents the work of its three editors, all of whom collected and annotated these songs while working in the Sea Islands of South Carolina during the Civil War, and also of other collectors who transcribed songs sung by former slaves in other parts of the country. The transcriptions are preceded by an introduction written by William Francis Allen, the chief editor of the collection, who provides his own explanation of the origin of the songs and the circumstances under which they were sung. One critic has noted that, like the editors' introductions to slave narratives, Allen's introduction seeks to lend to slave expressions the honor of white authority and approval. Gathered during and after the Civil War, the songs, most of which are religious, reflect the time of slavery, and their collectors worried that they were beginning to disappear. Allen declares the editors' purpose to be to preserve, "while it is still possible… these relics of a state of society which has passed away."
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    [publisher] => University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library
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